Huge Sale Up To 50% Off!

Antique Persian Kerman Pictorial Rug
Sale -50%

Antique Persian Kerman Pictorial Rug

SKU: 40144
$90,000.00$180,000.00

Extremly Fine & Rare Antique Persian Kerman Pictorial Rug, Hand Knotted, Circa 1890

Design: Pictorial ( Soor Israfil )

Israfil (Arabic: إِسْـرَافِـيْـل‎, romanizedIsrāfīl, alternate spellings: Israfel, Esrafil) is the angel who blows into the trumpet before Armageddon and sometimes depicted as the angel of music.Though unnamed in the Quran, he is one of the four Islamic archangels, the others being long with Mikhail, Jibrail and Azrael.It is believed that Israfil will blow the trumpet from a holy rock in Jerusalem to announce the Day of Resurrection. He is commonly thought as the counterpart of the Judeo-Christian archangel Raphael

Kerman carpets  are one of the traditional classifications of Persian carpets. Kerman is both a city and a province located in south central Iran, though the term sometimes describes a type which may have been made elsewhere. Kerman rugs are prized for a wide range of designs, a broad palette, use of natural dyes and fibers, great tensile strength and abrasion resistance, and expert color combinations. Typical manufacturing used an asymmetrical knot on cotton foundation, but rare examples include silk or part silk piles, or silk foundations with wool pile.

Extremly Fine & Rare Antique Persian Kerman Pictorial Rug, Hand Knotted, Circa 1890

Design: Pictorial ( Soor Israfil )

Israfil (Arabic: إِسْـرَافِـيْـل‎, romanizedIsrāfīl, alternate spellings: Israfel, Esrafil) is the angel who blows into the trumpet before Armageddon and sometimes depicted as the angel of music.Though unnamed in the Quran, he is one of the four Islamic archangels, the others being long with Mikhail, Jibrail and Azrael.It is believed that Israfil will blow the trumpet from a holy rock in Jerusalem to announce the Day of Resurrection. He is commonly thought as the counterpart of the Judeo-Christian archangel Raphael

Kerman carpets  are one of the traditional classifications of Persian carpets. Kerman is both a city and a province located in south central Iran, though the term sometimes describes a type which may have been made elsewhere. Kerman rugs are prized for a wide range of designs, a broad palette, use of natural dyes and fibers, great tensile strength and abrasion resistance, and expert color combinations. Typical manufacturing used an asymmetrical knot on cotton foundation, but rare examples include silk or part silk piles, or silk foundations with wool pile.